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In Daddy's arms I am tall
by
  
J KIT IN
Live Oak Media,, p2002.
1 sound disc (00:33) : digital ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 book (1 vol. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.)
 
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Etna Library J KIT IN Etna childrens Available
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A collection of poems celebrating African-American fathers by Angela Johnson, E. Ethelbert Miller, Carole Boston Weatherford, and others.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9781584300168
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
by Steptoe, Javaka (Illustrator); Schoeder, Alan
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Publishers Weekly Review

In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

This stunning homage to fathers offers a textured potpourri of voices and visuals. Love, pain, respect, adoration and just plain fun resonate in the works contributed by 12 poets, including Angela Johnson, Dakari Hru and Folami Abiade. A child's giggle-filled excitement reaches fever pitch in Hru's "Tickle Tickle" when he rough-houses with his dad: "me papa tickle me feet/ he call it `finger treat'/ me scream and run (but OH, WHAT FUN!)/ when papa tickle me feet." In Abiade's piece, a father wraps his child in reassurance : "in daddy's arms i am tall/ & close to the sun & warm/ in daddy's arms." Making his picture-book debut, Steptoe (son of the late Caldecott Honor artist John Steptoe) employs a wide variety of mixed-media techniques, offering a unique approach to each spread. The result is akin to strolling through an art gallery: wooden floor boards, burlap, buttons, pennies, seashells, tin and basketball leather are among the ingredients assembled here. Steptoe often renders central figures in cut- or torn-paper collage enhanced by chalk or pastel; one piece, inspired by Sanchez's "My Father's Eyes," measures 10 feet long and five feet high. Readers will find the poems universally accessible and the innovative artwork fresh and new at every turn. There is much to celebrate in this elegant volume, whether it's the strength and beauty of the poets' and artist's heritage or the loving bond between father and child that links all cultures. All ages. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Syndetic Solutions - The Horn Book Review for ISBN Number 9781584300168
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
by Steptoe, Javaka (Illustrator); Schoeder, Alan
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The Horn Book Review

In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers

The Horn Book


(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(Younger) A folklike story set in China tells of Mi Fei, an artist who skillfully paints the stories of gods and heroes on paper scrolls while living simply in his village, surrounded by loving neighbors. When alarming news comes that a great dragon has awakened from its hundred-years' sleep and is destroying the countryside, Mi Fei, at the villagers' behest, takes his scrolls and paints and journeys to the dragon's mountain. There, he encounters the fiery breath and lashing tail of the terrifying creature and learns that before the dragon can return to his slumber, someone must perform three tasks, or be devoured. Mi Fei is frightened, but clever, and he uses his beloved scrolls and his love for the people of his village to successfully complete the tasks. In the end, the gigantic dragon fades away until all that remains is a small paper version of himself. In an extraordinary feat of artistry, Sabuda uses the triple-page gate-fold illustrations both to relate the story in the style of Chinese scrolls and to capture the drama of the confrontation between the gentle artist and the awe-inspiring dragon. Each picture is cut from painted tissue paper created by Sabuda and placed on a background of handmade Japanese paper. The combination of the ever-increasing size of the dragon (climaxing in a picture of his teeth framing an entire spread) and the cleverness of Mi Fei creates a strong tale with plenty of action for the story-hour audience. h.b.z. Bob Graham Queenie, One of the Family; illus. by the author (Preschool, Younger) This warm family story begins on the opening endpapers as a bantam hen stands at the edge of a soft blue lake. Baby Caitlin and her mom and dad, walking in the countryside, soon spot the hen floundering in the lake, and Dad leaps in for a daring rescue. They warm the hen and bring her home, and "that might have been the end of the story...but it wasn't!" The hen, dubbed Queenie, soon becomes one of the family, taking over the dog's basket and witnessing Caitlin's first steps. But Caitlin's mom knows Queenie has another home, so the whole family sets off to return her to a nearby farm. "That might have been the end of the story...but it wasn't." Queenie returns each morning to lay a perfect brown egg in Bruno's basket, just right for Caitlin's breakfast or for baking a birthday cake. When a new baby arrives and Caitlin forgets to collect the eggs, Bruno hatches a litter of chicks. The immensely appealing animals and people are depicted in gentle watercolors with loose, comfortable lines. Th (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9781584300168
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
by Steptoe, Javaka (Illustrator); Schoeder, Alan
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BookList Review

In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Gr. 3^-5, younger for reading aloud. The son of John Steptoe has a true winner in fact, receiving the 1998 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his first picture book. Javaka Steptoe creates a splendid series of images in mixed media--from found objects, torn and cut paper, and color--to illustrate a series of short poems about fathers. From the stark simplicity of David Anderson's "Promises," with its cut-paper silhouette figure of a child's hug seen from behind his dad, to the many-layered image of shells, kente cloth, and paper for Sonia Sanchez's "My Father's Eyes," to the shirt made from a scrap of old tin ceiling in the evocative illustration for Carole Boston Weatherford's "Farmer," these arresting illustrations are a rich foil for the singing tenderness of the poetry. Different in spirit and texture but with the same warmth and joy as Shelley Rotner and Sheila M. Kelly's Lots of Dads (1997), this promises read-aloud and read-to-share comfort for many readings and rereadings. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido

Syndetic Solutions - Kirkus Review for ISBN Number 9781584300168
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
by Steptoe, Javaka (Illustrator); Schoeder, Alan
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Kirkus Review

In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers

Kirkus Reviews


Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Steptoe (son of the late John Steptoe) creates art for 13 poems that honor fathers, e.g., Sonia Sanchez's ""I have looked into/my father's eyes and seen an/african sunset."" Among others who have contributed to the volume are Folami Abiade (with the title poem), Lenard D. Moore, Dakari Hru, and Dinah Johnson. At times, elements of the poets' subject matter are depicted--photographed pennies are the background for the portrait of one father. Some poems are better than others; some are more message than art, although all of them are appealing. A particularly memorable sentiment is found in Davida Adedjouma's ""Artist to Artist,"" in which a woman appreciates that her artist father sorted mail ""all night and into the day"" for the family, and passed on to her the ""urge to create/characters with meat on their bones, in flesh-colored tones written in words as vivid"" as her crayon-box colors. Each piece elicits a work of art that translates beautifully to the printed page, from the jacket's gallery of small paintings to the half-title's portrait of a family--with smudged limbs and torsos, and heads made from painted discs or buttons--framed by colorful wooden heads. Brief biographies of the contributors appear in the back of this inventive, evocative book. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9781584300168
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers
by Steptoe, Javaka (Illustrator); Schoeder, Alan
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School Library Journal Review

In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall : African Americans Celebrating Fathers

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 3 Up‘This innovative, stunningly illustrated picture book celebrates the role of fathers in the African-American experience. The artist illustrates 13 poems with collages made from paper with pastel; appliqué; and a multitude of found objects, including fabric, coins, seashells, buttons, sand, seeds, and leaves. The artwork vibrates with emotion; even the simplest pieces, showing torn-paper figures on a solid background, capture the powerful bond between parent and child. The poems, written by Angela Johnson, Davida Adedjouma, Carole Boston Weatherford, and others, depict fathers working in the fields and in post offices, playing basketball, fishing, tickling, or hugging. Steptoe's own poem, "Seeds," is a tribute to his father: "You drew pictures of life/with your words." Libraries will want this title for Black History Month, National Poetry Month, Father's Day, or anytime a patron asks for a book about fathers. Teachers will find it inspiring in classroom units on poetry, or it can be used in conjunction with David Diaz's work to demonstrate collage techniques in an art class. Whatever its use, this lovely book deserves a place on library shelves.‘Dawn Amsberry, Oakland Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

 
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