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The legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao te ching
by Demi.
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J 299.5 DEM
Margaret K. McElderry Books,, 2007.
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
 
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Howe Library J 299.5 DEM Children's nonfiction Available
Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 1416912061
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
by Demi (Author, Illustrator)
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Publishers Weekly Review

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Demi (Jesus) introduces another thought-provoking new entry to her spiritual leaders series of books. This crisply designed volume is beautiful to look at, filled with Chinese symbolism and the author-illustrator's signature gold accents. A gold circle frames each delicate ink-and-watercolor image, echoing the circular symbol of t'ai chi, or "the harmony of Heaven" that opens and closes the book. However, the text is a sophisticated blend of legend (Lao Tzu was an 81-year-old man when he was born and lived to be 160), biography (he was keeper of the archives for the Court of Chou) and verses of the Tao Te Ching (the book that is said to fulfill Lao Tzu's mission to "help humanity live according to the Way of Heaven"), which may well prove puzzling to little ones. Students of Eastern religion or those who already embrace this faith tradition/spiritual philosophy will likely be the most enthusiastic explorers this book, though there is plenty here for any curiosity seeker-or Demi fan-to admire. Ages 7-10. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Syndetic Solutions - Kirkus Review for ISBN Number 1416912061
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
by Demi (Author, Illustrator)
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Kirkus Review

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

Kirkus Reviews


Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Taking on a perfect subject for her ethereal style of illustration, Demi presents episodes from the life of the possibly mythical philosopher, then adds passages from the world-changing book with which he is associated. The art, all painted within large circles, features a smiling, tubby old man--Lao Tzu is said to have been 81 years old at birth, "with snow-white hair and large ears"--gesturing gracefully at various Taoist figures and symbols, which are interpreted in a key at the end. Demi also offers substantial portions of the Tao Te Ching itself--evidently her own translations, as they're unsourced--as short passages on topics from "Silence" and "Balance" to "Just Be Ordinary" and even "Governing": "Governing a large country / is like cooking a small fish. / It can be spoiled with too much poking." Children too young to absorb the more abstract statements here will enjoy the colorful legends, but Lao Tzu's teachings about "the virtues of softness and yielding, of innocence and peace" are "great lessons for everyone, anytime, anywhere." (Biography/Philosophy. 8+) Copyright ├é┬ęKirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 1416912061
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
by Demi (Author, Illustrator)
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BookList Review

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

*Starred Review* This visual stunner is notable for the beauty of its art and design as well as its sensitive textual presentation of the legendary Chinese figure Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching, the book of wisdom attributed to him. Nearly half the pages relate the story of Lao Tzu, 'who may or may not have been born; who may or may not have founded Taoism, one of the greatest religions in the world." But at the heart of the book are 20 verses from the Tao Te Ching, in which the philosopher offers wisdom to help people understand how to live a virtuous life in accordance with the Way of Heaven. These pithy, sometimes paradoxical verses appear on individual pages. The meaning of the verse affects not only the choices of subject matter, but also artistic choices such as scale, brightness, and the definition of images. Dominating each parchmentlike page is a large circle of shining gold that frames the illustrations and the text. The ink drawings and paintings within are beautifully composed, confidently delineated, and varied in their use of rich patterns, open spaces, and suitable scale. Taoist symbols appear at the book's conclusion. Clear, concise writing, thoughtfully considered design, and striking illustrations come together to make this one of the best of Demi's many fine books on spiritual leaders.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2007 Booklist

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 1416912061
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
by Demi (Author, Illustrator)
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School Library Journal Review

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5 Up-"This is the legend of Lao Tzu, who may or may not have been born; who may or may not have founded Taoism, one of the greatest religions of the world-." Demi's elegant picture-book introduction to the legendary Chinese philosopher, often speculated to have been a contemporary of Confucius, combines nuggets of his purported life with 20 verses from the Tao Te Ching, which "he may or may not have written." Allegedly born an old man, Lao Tzu became widely known for his wisdom, to the point of being courted by the emperor. Adult readers will enjoy his response to the emperor's messenger. "I wash my ears because even one political word is dangerous. I wash my donkey's ears because donkeys are very political." The sketchy life story and the Tao teachings are vague, ambiguous, and mystical by turns. Demi provides no background explanation, acknowledgment of authority, or reference to other information sources. On the pretty pages, the text is set in gold letters, and the narrative and graceful paintings are contained in a gold circular frame on each parchment shaded page. The gold circles represent "Tao, The Way of Heaven," according to the concluding double-page listing of Taoist symbols and their meanings. Adult fans of the artist are the most likely audience, but the book does introduce a significant, lesser-known spiritual leader to children.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - The Horn Book Review for ISBN Number 1416912061
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
by Demi (Author, Illustrator)
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The Horn Book Review

The Legend of Lao Tzu and the Tao Te Ching

The Horn Book


(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(Intermediate) Continuing to explore the world's great thinkers (Su Dongpo) and religious leaders (Muhammad, rev. 7/03), Demi presents a legendary figure ""who may or may not have been born; who may or may not have founded Taoism, one of the greatest religions in the world."" Elegant, minimally limned figures and a text of (sometimes hard to read) gold, all set on circles of lightly clouded blue sky, make a sumptuous package. Lao Tzu was said to have been born, already old and wise, in 604 b.c.e. (the lack of source notes makes it impossible to ascertain whether this is the generally received version, or one of many); a falling leaf showed him the Way of Heaven; he went to court, gathered disciples, wrote his great book. These significant incidents frame the heart of Demi's book: twenty verses from the Tao Te Ching's eighty-one, each with a variety of concrete images to define a concept. ""Moderation"":""Stretch a bow to the very full, / and you'll wish you'd stopped in time. / Grind a sword to its sharpest edge, / and you'll find it soon grows dull."" Among these aphorisms, there's much wisdom that could be profitably discussed with older children; younger ones, attracted by the picture-book format, may enjoy the biographical part but be mystified by the philosophy. Thus, a worthy book that's likely to require an adult's introduction to find its audience. Many Taoist symbols (including the familiar yin/yang) are shown and defined at the end. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

 
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