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Kiss number 8 / written by Colleen AF Venable ; artwork by Ellen T. Crenshaw.

Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Town of Hanover Libraries.

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Howe Library YA Graphic Novel V 31254003580244 Teen room Available -
Howe Library YA Graphic Novel V 31254003695182 Teen room new shelf Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781596437098 (pbk.) :
  • ISBN: 159643709X (pbk.) :
  • Physical Description: 299 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : First Second, 2019.

Content descriptions

General Note:
Chiefly illustrations.
Summary, etc.:
Amanda's seemingly perfect life is turned upside down when she realizes she has a crush on her best friend, Cat, and uncovers a secret held by her father that could tear her family apart.
Subject: Graphic novels.
Lesbians > Fiction.
Interpersonal relations > Fiction.
Family problems > Fiction.
High schools > Fiction.
Schools > Fiction.

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9781596437098
Kiss Number 8
Kiss Number 8
by Venable, Colleen Af; Crenshaw, Ellen T. (Illustrator)
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School Library Journal Review

Kiss Number 8

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 9 Up-Mads lives in a conservative community with her deeply religious parents. Her social circle includes her friends from Catholic school, Cat, Adam, and Laura, but her best friend is her father. After overhearing a phone conversation that upsets him, she realizes that he's hiding something, but her parents refuse to answer her questions, leaving her angry and betrayed. Mads also wonders why her first seven kisses, with boys, aren't as stirring as kiss number eight, with Laura, and why she feels something deeper than friendship for Cat. A mysterious letter and an explosive confrontation with her parents and grandparents lead to a difficult realization, shaking up their relationships. This graphic novel addresses transphobia, sexuality, and hypocrisy. The art's retro feel serves the story well and is most powerful when depicting the contrast between truth and lies. The characters aren't especially deep but they help frame Mads's world. The resolution is realistically complicated, highlighting Mads's agency as she manages her conflicts. Though characters spend more time than necessary proclaiming their trans- and homophobic views, Mads's decisiveness and the clear look at how so-called "values" can mask harmful attitudes make this a thought-provoking book. VERDICT A solid addition to YA shelves.-Carla Riemer, -Claremont Middle School, Oakland © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - Kirkus Review for ISBN Number 9781596437098
Kiss Number 8
Kiss Number 8
by Venable, Colleen Af; Crenshaw, Ellen T. (Illustrator)
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Kirkus Review

Kiss Number 8

Kirkus Reviews


Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The discovery of long-buried family secrets brings Amanda closer to owning her own. Amanda is the demure sidekick to the wild and sexy Cat, who knows how to have a good time but doesn't always know how to be a great friend. Her real best friend, though, is her Catholic dad. They go to Sunday baseball games, share favorite TV shows, and trounce each other in video games. When Amanda discovers that her runaway grandmother was actually an early transgender rights activist who transitioned late in life, it brings unbearable tension into their relationship. It also makes Amanda wake up to parts of herself she's not yet been able to acknowledge, such as how she really feels when she's around Cat. These revelations wreak havoc on her relationships. Fortunately, Amanda, who is white, finds a new, multiracial crew from the public school. Their lack of need for labels, for the gender binary, or to overexplain themselves allows Amanda to relax into self-acceptance. It's a story of family and friendship and love in all its forms, perfect for the graphic novel format and elevated by the combined art and narrative. For example, when Amanda's father tells his mother's story, his distorted recollections are laid out in juxtaposition with actual events, resulting in an achingly moving vignette. The characters shine, fully human and permitted to be flawed. Hope prevails. A rare blend of tender and revolutionary. (Graphic novel. 13-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9781596437098
Kiss Number 8
Kiss Number 8
by Venable, Colleen Af; Crenshaw, Ellen T. (Illustrator)
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Publishers Weekly Review

Kiss Number 8

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

In 2004, Amanda's life is full of comfortable constants: attending her Catholic high school; spending time with her best friend, Cat; attending church with her family; and watching minor league baseball and bad TV with her beloved father. An overheard conversation and a mysterious letter set her on the path to uncovering a family secret; around the same time, she realizes that she is probably in love with Cat. Venable (Mervin the Sloth Is About to Do the Best Thing in the World) creates a remarkably full picture of Amanda's life-family, school, church, baseball, the local music scene, and the corresponding and overlapping relationship dynamics. Amanda's decisions-confronting her family about the secret, exploring her sexuality-lead to realistically messy consequences that are not easily remedied, and the way these open up and close off areas of her life is handled well. Blackandwhite cartoon art by Crenshaw (Test Your Baby's IQ) complements the narrative, offering distinct characters and conveying what the dialogue alone can't. A queer comingofage story that earns its powerful emotional impact. Ages 14-up. Author's agent: Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - New York Times Review for ISBN Number 9781596437098
Kiss Number 8
Kiss Number 8
by Venable, Colleen Af; Crenshaw, Ellen T. (Illustrator)
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New York Times Review

Kiss Number 8

New York Times


June 9, 2019

Copyright (c) The New York Times Company

EMMA SAYLOR PAYNE, the protagonist of Sarah Dessen's the rest of the story (Balzer + Bray, 448 pp., $19.99; ages 13 and up), is a girl of two first names, and of two lives: the one she lived with her mom, Waverly, an addict who died of an overdose when Emma was 12, and the one that came after. At 17, Emma has largely been shielded from her mom's past by her dad and grandmother, but she can't help remembering the stories Waverly used to tell about the big lake with the cold, clear water where she grew up. In the summer, the stars were bright and, as her mom told it, "everything was going to be O.K." Emma might never have gone back to the lake herself except that her summer plans went awry, and with her dad and his new wife heading off to their honeymoon in Greece, she needed somewhere to stay. Thus heralds her return to a place eerily frozen in her memory, just under the surface but coming back bit by bit. Suddenly she's surrounded by relatives she hasn't seen in years but who look just like her, not to mention the best friend she had as a little girl, a boy named Roo who's as grown up as she is, now. They all call her Saylor, which is what her mom used to call her. But that's just the beginning of what Emma - or is it Saylor? - starts to uncover. Of course, the deepest mystery of all, and the most important thing to discover, is about herself. There's no magic that lets us actually live in books yet, but plunging into the cold, clear waters of Dessen's slowly winding summer-spell, a tale of family lost and found, is pretty darn close. Lovers who surmount the odds have always been intense emotional fodder, but rarely have we seen a story like Meredith RUSSO'S BIRTHDAY (Flatiron, 336 pp., $18.99; ages 14 and up). Morgan and Eric have been best friends since, basically, the day they were born at the same hospital during a freak September blizzard in their Tennessee hometown. They've celebrated every birthday together since then, through the death of Morgan's mom, through Eric's dive into football, a strategic move to please his abusive father. But there's a secret Morgan is terrified to reveal to anyone, most of all the person he cares about the most: He feels as if he should have been a girl, and being in the wrong body is very nearly killing him. Russo is herself trans, and she brings her whole heart to a story laced with pain that, in the end, lifts with hope. The "birthday" structure could feel like a gimmick - she puts us in Eric's and Morgan's bodies, alternating perspectives, for each celebration from ages 13 to 18 - but it works thanks to her characters, especially Morgan, who is true and raw, haunting and undeniable. One of the great wonders of Y. A. fiction is its power to create new narratives that replace fear and hatred with empathy and acceptance, and to show young people a path for the future that's better than what we've seen. Russo's narrative expression of the need to live one's truth, and the option of choosing love through it all, is a valuable reminder of what really matters. "HERE'S SOMETHING YOU should know about me: I'm a terrible daughter," Chloe Pierce announces in the first sentence of Kristina Forest's debut novel, I wanna be WHERE YOU ARE (Roaring Brook, 272 pp., $17.99; ages 12 and up). It'S a great Opener even though it's hardly true - Chloe, "a 17year-old black girl living in the middle of nowhere, New Jersey," is a talented dancer who dreams of becoming a professional ballerina; she's the kind of good kid most parents would kvell over. But Chloe's dad died when she was 3, and her extra-protective mom has forbidden her from auditioning for a New York City dance company, which she has her heart set on. When her mom leaves for a tropical vacation with her boyfriend, Chloe comes up with a plan: Drive herself to the audition in D.C., try out, and get a spot. After that, her mom has to say yes ... right? A road trip is a satisfying catalyst in itself; the story is further sparked by Chloe's irritating neighbor, Eli, who blackmails her into taking him - and his dog, Geezer - along for the ride, and who has his own complicated emotional situation in the works. He's also cute, and they have something of a past, creating a highly shippable will-they-won't-they dynamic. But Forest's novel offers more than romance. This is a bighearted story about being brave enough to go for what you want, even when the rules tell you something different. IN MICHELLE RUIZ KEILS ALL OF US WITH WINGS (Soho Teen, 360 pp., $18.99; ages 16 and up), a 17-year-old named Xochi is adrift in the world. She's never known her Mexican father, and has led a peripatetic existence with her white mother, Gina, and her mother's abusive ex-boyfriend. But when Gina gets out of town, it's Xochi's turn to escape the man who has, in her mother's absence, abused her, too. She finds her way to an enchanting, musical, wild and weird San Francisco, where she meets an equally enchanting 12-year-old, the brilliant-beyondher-years Pallas, the daughter of rock stars who live with a troupe of their polyamorous band members and friends in a Victorian mansion. Xochi gets a job as Pallas's "governess," and moves in with the family. That's only the beginning. During an after-party at the mansion on the vernal equinox, a night charged with all sorts of energies (and a tongue-piercing), Pallas and Xochi accidentally call up two "waterbabies," fey creatures who emerge from a tub on a quest for justice. They're after anyone who's hurt, or who is currently hurting, Xochi. Keil's ambitious debut is jam-packed with twists and depth and froth and function - the world of this novel is real, but magical, too. At times you're even in the perspective of a kind bookstore cat. The lyricism skews heavy at times, and the many side stories and voices make for a slower read, but maybe that's the point: The effect is something of a transcendent journey. Those who keep with it (drug references and sexual trauma as well as a flirtation with an older man make it better for older teenagers or adults) will find a book about embracing everything - people, lifestyles, beliefs, experiences - and, in so doing, finding your own distinct power. The very first scene in Colleen AF Venable's graphic novel KISS NUMBER 8 (First Second, 320 pp., $17.99; ages 13 and up), drawn by Ellen T. Crenshaw, is of a car parked across from a house with a "Bush/ Cheney '04" campaign sign standing in its front yard. It's an important detail to remember. Venable follows an irrepressible main character called Mads, short for Amanda, a Catholic high school student who's almost as interested in finding out why everyone's so obsessed with kissing as she is with hanging out with her beloved dad. That is, until something weird starts happening at home. Her parents are lying to her, and whatever it is, it's big. What Mads ultimately finds out is more worldaltering than she could have imagined, causing her to question her friendships, her family history, her father's beliefs and her own sexual orientation. It's not easy, but it's a necessary process in becoming the person she truly wants to be. In a Q. and A. that follows the novel, Venable notes that 2004, when she started working on the book, "was a crazy rough time to come out as queer." Stereotypes prevailed, trans representation was negligible and gay marriage wasn't legal. Venable's frequently heartbreaking recollection of the abuse and torment that people went through for being "different" - and the fact that it still happens all too frequently - is a powerful reminder of how far we still have to go. JEN DOLL is the author of the young adult novel "Unclaimed Baggage" and the memoir "Save the Date."

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9781596437098
Kiss Number 8
Kiss Number 8
by Venable, Colleen Af; Crenshaw, Ellen T. (Illustrator)
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BookList Review

Kiss Number 8

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

On the surface, Amanda's life seems ideal. She has good friends at church and school, a great relationship with her dad, and her only real problems are a nagging mom and unwanted attention from the boy next door. Overhearing her father talking to another woman changes everything in an instant. To make matters worse, Amanda is beginning to realize that she has romantic feelings for Cat, her best friend. Trying to cope with the confusion, Amanda makes some rash, poor decisions and digs herself into a heap of trouble, but help comes from a couple of unexpected sources. Realistic relationships, well-developed characters of all ages, and diverse and positive LGBTQ representation make this an excellent choice for a wide range of readers. Visually, the black-and-white pages are crowded with text and panels, but Crenshaw really captures the emotional qualities of every character. Amanda is particularly expressive, and her actions are authentically age-appropriate. This isn't the easiest coming-of-age story, but it's one that will resonate with young readers, especially those questioning their sexuality.--Summer Hayes Copyright 2010 Booklist


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